Concept of flying tanks!!

On paper, the idea seems simple enough — just put wings on tanks so that they become a tank-gliders, then tow a fleet of them into the air, fly deep into the enemy’s vulnerable rear area, cut them loose, and their crews can glide them down to land, ready for battle. Although seemingly laughable on first look, the flying tank solves a major problem in airborne warfare by providing heavy weapons and armored support to airborne troops. It offers a means to deploy heavy combat units unexpectedly and quickly where the enemy least expects. It is no surprise therefore that four major nations engaged in flying tank research during the 1930s and 1940s, including the Soviet Union, the USA, Japan and England. Of those, only the Soviets would bring prototypes to the flying stage — and they did it four times with four separate vehicles. Today in history on September 2, 1942, marks the 70th anniversary of the first and only flight of the Soviet Union’s Antonov A-40 Krylya Tanka, the most ambitious of the designs and the world’s only true flying tank

flying tank

About combatgears

I am a Software Development Engineer and I am interested in Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, Neural Networks, Weapons Technology etc. I follow day to day geopolitical events and technological advancements very closely and enthusiastic about expressing my opinions on them. In future I wish to establish my own company. Young that I am, I am slowly learning and pacing towards fulfilling that goal. I also own the blog :- "www.combatgears.wordpress.com" which is popular in North America, Europe, India, Australia and Far East countries. I plan to expand this blog into full fledged defence journal in recent future. Me and my team constantly strive to produce quality and informative contents for our site at the same time present it in an interesting manner.

Posted on April 12, 2013, in Army, Aviation. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: